I can’t tell you how many industry meetings I’ve gone to where industry leaders are trying to rally the troops — golf course superintendents — to get them to speak out against potential and unfair legislation that could affect their livelihoods.

This is one of them.

The Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have proposed a rule to expand the definition of the “Waters of the U.S.” regulation (WOTUS) for all Clean Water Act (CWA) programs, including water on golf courses such as drainage ditches, storm water ditches and water storage or treatment ponds on golf courses.

I know … it’s crazy.

The proposed changes would add federal control of land and water resources in the U.S., triggering substantial additional permitting and regulatory requirements, according to the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America (GCSAA).

The effect would add regulatory burdens and costs that would keep superintendents from tending to routine erosion control. It would also keep superintendents from utilizing best management practices for environmental stewardship, the GCSAA states.

Yes, you read that last statement correctly. So much for environmental prowess.

“We support the Clean Water Act and can see that there is a need to clarify some of the jurisdictional questions, but this proposed regulation goes too far. It is not the answer. It would bring unnecessary challenges to everyone, not just the golf industry,” said Mark Johnson, associate director of environmental programs for the GCSAA.

This is a classic case of an outside agency with a black-and-white plan. There’s no gray area here, and there has to be.

That’s why superintendents and other industry people need to get involved and show government officials that there is a gray area — golf courses.

Superintendents need to voice their opposition to legislators about WOTUS.

Incidentally, the GCSAA has joined with more than 35 other national associations and organizations to be part of the Waters Advocacy Coalition (WAC) to voice concern about the proposed “Waters of the U.S.” regulation. The coalition includes golf industry groups such as PGA of America, Club Managers Association of America, American Society of Golf Course Architects, Golf Course Builders Association of America, National Club Association and National Golf Course Owners Association. They are voicing concerns to state and federal policymakers about expanding jurisdiction of the CWA.

Want to get involved and voice your opinion? Contact one of these organizations. Be part of the troop rallying.

This is a classic case of an outside agency with a black-and-white plan. There is no gray area here.

That’s why superintendents and other industry people need to get involved and show government officials that there is a gray area — golf courses.

Superintendents need to voice their opposition to legislators about the proposed “Waters of the U.S.” regulation or WOTUS.

Incidentally, the GCSAA has joined with more than 35 other national associations and organizations to be part of the Waters Advocacy Coalition (WAC) to voice concern about the proposed “Waters of the U.S.” regulation. The coalition includes golf industry groups such as PGA of America, Club Managers Association of America, American Society of Golf Course Architects, Golf Course Builders Association of America, National Club Association and National Golf Course Owners Association. They are voicing concerns to state and federal policymakers about expanding jurisdiction of the CWA.

Want to get involved and voice your opinion? Contact one of these organizations. Be part of the troop rallying.